Twisted Tales – Bringer of Woe (2019)

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Misery is a human curse. As a prisoner of the mundane, we are educated through this horror by the thrash/deathmetal quartet from Serbia, Twisted Tales, in their independent worldwide release of their second album, Bringer Of Woe, in September 20th. Like a musical grotesque, the collection takes earsplitting and slam-bang genre with pride as they divided it into 12 tracks, each battling with the other, all the while forming a beastly phantom in a world populated by sorrow, trafficked by malice, and diseased with malefaction.

Snake Eyes was the sound of creaking doors and brief whispers. With an austere guitarring, it gave a visual setting to the mind. A challenging place, discouraging by all means. After this short prelude came Bringer Of Woe. Scattered with dubs of bass, it showcased rips of guitar—impulses that appeared without notice. Like a disoriented shrieking. The particular style of the soloist was first- class. He was simply tearing open the very air. The tempo was altered as if falling out of beat. It was the kind of evil that persuades, that invites.

Bittersweet Sorrow has proven that the band was well-suited for the genre. It was performed in a highly quarrelsome manner and with solid foundation. The guitars just stab you in the back and you would not even know it. It was begrudgingly good. This much high level of playing that the scales were confusing.
Father was about the vocal acrobatics while the singer screams the title. It was rough on the skin yet appealing. This song specifically needed to be played on full volume. It was like elaborating all the sins in the world. The solo was excellent, running up and down scales and just raping the guitar until everything becomes disordered. Yet, you still can sense the message. It was clear. This was hardcore death metal.

Another bass riff opened Slow Down. This was an interesting piece since they kept changing the tempo. Gradually decreasing and decreasing, it was palatable that they remained loyal to the title. An impressive experiment. However, the solo resumed the original speed in a chaotic tone.
Another dense track was Open Eyes And See… The ability of the vocalist to constantly support his voice in that damaging technique was a serious skill. Every now and then, weeping guitars would happen, wrecking the vibrato arm and altering the pitch into numerous versions along with the drum rolls. Hellfire was a fast, bass-introduced track. The unity of instruments could be observed at this point. There was teamwork in the arrangement of the music. This piece included an almost acoustic flamenco and hollow drums. Again, the solo molested the electric guitar that it was near a crime. At this rate they continued like all of hell broke loose until the end.

Human had bits of tremolos and multiple voices. It was heavy. The solo never failed to shape the song along with the double peds as they both raise and disjoint your soul. Likewise, Sheol had the same routine, a hypnotic solo and monstrous vocals which takes form so ghastly. It was a desperate cry. All the instruments were lifelike villainous characters.

Trapped Under Glass began with another bass riff, followed by the rest. The significant feature here was the voice overs, whispering ear-to-ear like little demons perched on your shoulders. Misanthropia was hellish. It reeked of all things evil. The tone was malignant. The abuse of tempo was persistent. Lyric-wise, it was an artless declaration of hatred.

Last track, Before I Go To Hell And Burn, focused on speed. Like Alice falling down a hellhole, it was suffocated with action. Everything passed in a heartbeat and would leave you palpitating. The degree was infectious. After some seconds of pause, there was a little encore of guitars.
Bringer Of Woes was a beautiful anomaly. No dead air. Complicated with hideous twists and clumsy experiments. The solos were carefully crafted and executed. The vocals were nonhuman. It could almost be a soundtrack for Ghost Rider and the likes of hell.

8/10

Estefan Malgret.

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